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dc.contributor.authorShaked, D.
dc.contributor.authorMillman, Z.B.
dc.contributor.authorBeatty Moody, D.L.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T16:42:04Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T16:42:04Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85065654682&doi=10.1371%2fjournal.pone.0216338&partnerID=40&md5=f4e8a979a0e0e580dd8a50878a0af226
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10761
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to examine the interactive relations of socioeconomic status and race to corticolimbic regions that may play a key role in translating stress to the poor health outcomes overrepresented among those of lower socioeconomic status and African American race. Participants were 200 community-dwelling, self-identified African American and White adults from the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span SCAN study. Brain volumes were derived using T1-weighted MP-RAGE images. Socioeconomic status by race interactions were observed for right medial prefrontal cortex (B = .26, p = .014), left medial prefrontal cortex (B = .26, p = .017), left orbital prefrontal cortex (B = .22, p = .037), and left anterior cingulate cortex (B = .27, p = .018), wherein higher socioeconomic status Whites had greater volumes than all other groups. Additionally, higher versus lower socioeconomic status persons had greater right and left hippocampal (B = -.15, p = .030; B = -.19, p = .004, respectively) and amygdalar (B = -.17, p = .015; B = -.21; p = .002, respectively) volumes. Whites had greater right and left hippocampal (B = -.17, p = .012; B = -.20, p = .003, respectively), right orbital prefrontal cortex (B = -.34, p < 0.001), and right anterior cingulate cortex (B = -.18, p = 0.011) volumes than African Americans. Among many factors, the higher levels of lifetime chronic stress associated with lower socioeconomic status and African American race may adversely affect corticolimbic circuitry. These relations may help explain race- and socioeconomic status-related disparities in adverse health outcomes. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0216338en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS ONE
dc.subject.meshAfrican Americansen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Classen_US
dc.titleSociodemographic disparities in corticolimbic structuresen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0216338
dc.identifier.pmid31071128


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