Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGossa, W.
dc.contributor.authorJones, C.
dc.contributor.authorRaiciulescu, S.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T16:41:55Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T16:41:55Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85066060851&doi=10.22454%2fFamMed.2019.190022&partnerID=40&md5=891d36eca8cdcab034070dc6f100f622
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10634
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In Ethiopia, family medicine began in 2013. The objective of this study was to compare family medicine residents’ attitudes about training in Ethiopia with those at a program in the United States. METHODS: Family medicine residents at Addis Ababa University in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and the University of Maryland in Baltimore, Maryland completed a 43-item Likert scale survey in 2017. The survey assessed residents’ attitudes about residency education, patient care, independence as family physicians, finances, impact of residency on personal life, and women’s issues. We calculated descriptive statistics on the demographics data and analyzed survey responses using a two-sample t-test. RESULTS: A total of 18 (75%) Ethiopian residents and 18 (60%) US residents completed the survey (n=36). The Ethiopian residents had a wider age distribution (25-50 years) than the US residents (25-34 years). More US residents were female (72%) compared to the Ethiopian cohort (50%), while more Ethiopian residents were married (72%) compared to the US cohort (47%). There were statistically significant differences in attitudes toward patient care (P=0.005) and finances (P<0.001), differences approaching significance in attitudes toward residency education, and no significant differences in independence as family physicians, the impact of residency on personal life, and women’s issues in family medicine. CONCLUSIONS: Across two very different cultures, resident attitudes about independence as family physicians, the impact of residency on personal life and women’s issues, were largely similar, while cross-national differences in attitudes were found relative to residency education, patient care, and finances. Copyright 2019, Society of Teachers of Family Medicine. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.22454/FamMed.2019.190022en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherSociety of Teachers of Family Medicineen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFamily Medicine
dc.subject.meshAttitudeen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshInternship and Residencyen_US
dc.subject.meshEthiopiaen_US
dc.subject.mesh
dc.subject.meshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleFamily medicine residents' attitudes about training in Ethiopia and the United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.22454/FamMed.2019.190022
dc.identifier.pmid31081914


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record