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dc.contributor.authorMason, A.E.
dc.contributor.authorSaslow, L.
dc.contributor.authorMoran, P.J.
dc.contributor.authorSchleicher, S.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T16:41:54Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T16:41:54Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85066867259&doi=10.2196%2f11002&partnerID=40&md5=02c79a7b6a7e102c3528a1e5328a7726
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10629
dc.description.abstractBackground: Diet patterns have a profound influence on glycemic control for individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and craving-related eating is an important obstacle to dietary adherence. A growing body of research suggests that carbohydrate-restricted (CR) diets can improve glycemic control and reduce medication dependence in T2DM. However, limited data speak to the effects of long-term adherence to CR diets. Mindful eating training has been shown to reduce craving-related eating in overweight populations but has yet to be examined as a behavioral support for dietary adherence in T2DM. This trial examines behavioral mechanisms, particularly craving-related eating, through which mindful eating training might improve adherence to CR dietary recommendations in T2DM. This will clarify the importance of focusing on craving-related eating in the optimization of dietary adherence interventions. Objective: The aim of this trial is to determine whether providing training in mindful eating increases adherence to a CR dietary recommendation in T2DM. Methods: We are randomizing 60 participants to receive a CR diet with or without mindful eating training (12-week group intervention) and are following participants for 12 weeks after intervention completion. We hypothesize that participants who receive mindful eating training (relative to those who do not) will demonstrate greater adherence to the CR diet. Results: Our primary outcome is change in craving-related eating, as assessed using an ecological momentary assessment mobile phone-based platform. Secondary behavioral pathway outcomes include changes in stress-related eating, impulsivity, glycemic control, weight change, dietary adherence, and resumption of dietary adherence after dietary nonadherence. Conclusions: This theory-driven trial will shed light on the impact of mindfulness training on mechanisms that may impact dietary adherence in T2DM. Copyright Ashley E Mason, Laura Saslow, Patricia J Moran, Sarah Kim, Hiba Abousleiman, Alison Hartman, Robert Richler, Samantha Schleicher, Wendy Hartogensis, Elissa S Epel, Frederick Hecht.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis trial was supported by National Institutes of Health grants from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH; R61AT009333; FH, ESE), the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (K23HL133442; AEM), the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K01DK107456; LS), and NCCIH (K24AT007827; FH).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.2196/11002en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherJournal of Medical Internet Researchen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Internet Research
dc.subjectDiabetes mellitusen_US
dc.subjectDiet, ketogenicen_US
dc.subjectMind-body therapiesen_US
dc.subjectMindfulnessen_US
dc.subjectTreatment adherence and complianceen_US
dc.titleExamining the effects of mindful eating training on adherence to a carbohydrate-restricted diet in patients with type 2 diabetes (The DeLISH study): Protocol for a randomized controlled trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2196/11002


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