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dc.contributor.authorXu, Y.
dc.contributor.authorWang, W.
dc.contributor.authorChen, M.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T14:49:32Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T14:49:32Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85068534862&doi=10.1186%2fs12989-019-0312-6&partnerID=40&md5=e2a09e68c72954079b341c90d1210486
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10602
dc.description.abstractBackground: Obesity is an uncontrolled global epidemic and one of the leading global public health challenges. Maternal exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) may adversely program offspring's adiposity, suggesting a specialized role of PM2.5 pollution in the global obesity epidemic. However, the vulnerable window for this adverse programming and how it is cross-generationally transmitted have not been determined. Therefore, in the present study, female C57Bl/6 J mice were exposed to filtered air (FA) or concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) during different periods, and the development and adulthood adiposity of their four-generational offspring were assessed. Results: Our data show that the pre-conceptional but not gestational exposure to CAP was sufficient to cause male but not female offspring's low birth weight, accelerated postnatal weight gain, and increased adulthood adiposity. These adverse developmental traits were transmitted into the F2 offspring born by the female but not male F1 offspring of CAP-exposed dams. In contrast, no adverse development was noted in the F3 offspring. Conclusions: The present study identified a pre-conceptional window for the adverse programming of adiposity by maternal exposure to PM2.5, and showed that it was maternally transmitted into the third generation. These data not only call special attention to the protection of women from exposure to PM2.5, but also may facilitate the development of intervention to prevent this adverse programming. Copyright 2019 The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01ES024516 to ZY), the American Heart Association (13SDG17070131 to ZY), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81270342 to YX, 91643205 to HK and 81500216 to MC) and Shanghai Pujiang Program (17PJ1401300 to YX).en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12989-019-0312-6en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofParticle and Fibre Toxicology
dc.subjectCross-generational transmissionen_US
dc.subjectDevelopmental programmingen_US
dc.subjectMaternal exposureen_US
dc.subjectObesityen_US
dc.subjectPM2.5en_US
dc.titleDevelopmental programming of obesity by maternal exposure to concentrated ambient PM2.5 is maternally transmitted into the third generation in a mouse modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12989-019-0312-6
dc.identifier.pmid31266526


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