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dc.contributor.authorBroome, K.
dc.contributor.authorHudson, I.
dc.contributor.authorPotter, K.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T14:49:27Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T14:49:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85068067047&doi=10.3389%2ffneur.2019.00408&partnerID=40&md5=0d7c070563033f2fbf5dca550d4461e4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10534
dc.description.abstractObjective: A modified reach-to-grasp task has been developed for the purpose of investigating arm-hand coordination in a supine position in the functional magnetic resonance imaging environment. The objective of this study was to investigate the kinematics of the reach-to-grasp task, in stroke and healthy participants. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Movement laboratory. Participants: Ten stroke participants and 10 age-matched healthy participants performed 10 repetitions of the modified reach-to-grasp task in two conditions - a natural condition and a standardized condition in a splint. Intervention: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: Kinematic variables of start time of transport, start time of aperture, movement duration, time of peak velocity (PV), percentage time of PV, peak deceleration (PD), percentage time of PD, peak aperture (PA), time of PA, and percentage time of PA were recorded. The correlation between key events in the grasp and transport trajectories were investigated. Performance between conditions and groups were compared. Results: Both groups demonstrated a significant correlation between the start time of aperture and the start time of transport and between the time of PA and PV in both conditions. A significant correlation was found between the time of PA and the PD in both conditions for the healthy group, but in neither condition for the stroke group. Movements by participants with stroke had a significantly longer movement duration, a smaller PV, and an earlier absolute time of PV and PD, and an earlier percentage time of PV and PD. They also had a smaller aperture than healthy participants. Wearing the splint resulted in a significantly higher PV, later absolute and percentage time of PV, PD, and PA, and a smaller PA compared to moving without the splint. The timing of transport variables time to peak velocity and time to peak deceleration, were strongest determinants of movement duration. Conclusion: The modified reach-to-grasp movement performed without the constraint of the splint, demonstrates similar motor control and coordination between the grasp and transport components of reach-to-grasp as in seated reach-to-grasp. This provides a new task that may be used to explore reach-to-grasp in the fMRI environment. Copyright Copyright 2019 Broome, Hudson, Potter, Kulk, Dunn, Arm, Zeffiro, Cooper, Tian and van Vliet. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKB was supported by a National Stroke Foundation Honours grant and PvV was supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (Grant no. 100100439) during the period of this study.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.00408en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Media S.A.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Neurology
dc.subjectCoordinationen_US
dc.subjectGraspen_US
dc.subjectReachingen_US
dc.subjectStrokeen_US
dc.subjectUpper limben_US
dc.titleA modified reach-to-grasp task in a supine position shows coordination between elbow and hand movements after strokeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fneur.2019.00408


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