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dc.contributor.authorSawe, H.R.
dc.contributor.authorAkomeah, A.
dc.contributor.authorMfinanga, J.A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T17:30:16Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T17:30:16Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85070905792&doi=10.1186%2fs12909-019-1729-1&partnerID=40&md5=7a8325cd530c2b761ed5172731b7040d
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10498
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Emergency Medicine (EM) is a rapidly developing specialty in Africa with several emergency medicine residency-training programs (EMRPs) established across the continent over the past decade. Despite rapid proliferation of the specialty, little is known about emergency care curriculum structure and content. We provide an overview of Africa's EMRPs. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional survey conducted of EMRPs in Africa between January 2017 and December 2017. Data were prospectively collected using a structured survey that was developed and administered through online data capture software, REDCap (Version 7.2.2, Vanderbilt, Nashville, TN, USA). Survey questions focused on curriculum structure and design, including clinical rotations, didactics, research, and evaluation. Data are summarized with descriptive statistics. RESULTS: The survey was sent to the leadership of 15 EMRPs in 12 different African countries and 11 (73%) responded. Five (46%) of the responding programs were started by local non-EM trained faculty, two (18%) were started by international partners, and the remainder by a combination of local non-EM faculty and international partners. Overall, Seven (64%) of the countries offer a 4-year EMRP. In General, 40% of curriculums are influenced the contents developed by African Federation for Emergency Medicine. All programs offer resident led-didactics, with a median of 12 h (Interquartile range 9-6 h) per month. All EMRPs have a mandatory research requirement. All EMRPs offer clinical rotations in the ED, Paediatrics, and Obstetrics and Gynaecology, while only 2 programs offer rotations in radiology and neonatal intensive care units. Only 46% of EMRPs have in-ED clinical supervision by specialist. CONCLUSION: The EMRPs in Africa were started by non-EM trained local faculty alone or collaboration with international partners. The curriculum offers most exposure to ED, and less exposure in radiology and neonatal intensive care. Residents are highly involved in leading didactics and less than half of the programs have in-ED specialist supervision of patient care.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-019-1729-1en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC medical education
dc.subjectAfricaen_US
dc.subjectEmergency medicineen_US
dc.subjectEmergency trainingen_US
dc.subjectResidencyen_US
dc.titleEmergency medicine residency training in Africa: overview of curriculumen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12909-019-1729-1
dc.identifier.pmid31366353


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