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dc.contributor.authorWatnick, T.
dc.contributor.authorSeliger, S.L.
dc.contributor.authorChen, H.
dc.contributor.authorSawan, M.A.
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, D.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y.
dc.contributor.authorHong, S.N.
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T17:30:15Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T17:30:15Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85070894904&doi=10.1186%2fs12882-019-1500-1&partnerID=40&md5=e14af49ee387c5f6df3be662c7390971
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10491
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Impaired left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS) can be a sign of subclinical cardiac dysfunction even in patients with otherwise preserved ejection fraction (EF). Transmitral early filling velocity to early diastolic strain rate (E/SRe) is a novel measure of LV filling pressure, which is often affected early in cardiac disease. Methods: A total of 110 ADPKD patients not on dialysis were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent an extensive echocardiographic examination including two-dimensional speckle tracking. GLS and strain rates were measured. The distribution of GLS and E/SRe was determined and patient characteristics were compared by median levels of GLS (- 17.8%) and E/SRe (91.4 cm). Twenty healthy participants were included as control group. Results: There was a significantly worse GLS in the ADPKD patients (mean: - 17.8 ± 2.5%) compared to the healthy controls (mean: - 21.9 ± 1.9%), p < 0.001. The same was true for E/SRe (mean: 10.0 ± 0.3 cm) compared to the control group (mean: 6.5 ± 0.3 cm), p < 0.001. In simple logistic regression, male gender (OR: 4.74 [2.10-10.71], p < 0.001), fasting glucose (odds ratio (OR) 1.05 [1.01-1.10], p = 0.024), htTKV (OR: 1.07 [1.01-1.13], p = 0.013), HDL cholesterol (OR: 0.97 [0.94, 0.996], p = 0.025), triglycerides (OR: 1.01 [1.00-1.02], p = 0.039), hemoglobin (OR: 1.50 [1.11-2.04], p = 0.009), and β-blocker use (OR: 1.07 [1.01, 1.13], p = 0.013) were all associated with higher GLS. After multivariate logistic regression with backward model selection, only male gender (OR: 5.78 [2.27-14.71], p < 0.001) and β-blocker use (OR: 14.00 [1.60, 122.51], p = 0.017) remained significant. In simple logistic regression models, BMI (OR: 1.11 [1.02-1.20], p = 0.015), systolic blood pressure (OR: 1.03 [1.00-1.06], p = 0.027) and β-blocker use (OR: 17.12 [2.15-136.20], p = 0.007) were associated with higher E/SRe - a novel measure of left ventricular filling pressure. After backward elimination, only β-blocker use (OR: 17.22 [2.16, 137.14], p = 0.007) remained significant. Conclusion: Higher GLS and E/SRe are common in ADPKD patients, even in patients with preserved eGFR and normal left ventricular EF. GLS and E/SRe may aid in cardiovascular risk stratification in patients with ADPKD as they represent early markers of cardiac dysfunction. Copyright 2019 The Author(s).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from the Lundbeck Foundation to UCSF to fund Lundbeck Foundation Clinical Research Fellowship for Mats Højbjerg Lassen. Furthermore, Mats Højbjerg Lassen received a research grant from Gentofte & Herlev Hospital. The Baltimore PKD Center and Drs. Seliger and Watnick are supported by a grant from the NIDDKP30 DK090868. MP is supported by NIH/NIDDKK23 DK099238 and a Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Clinical Scientist Development Award.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s12882-019-1500-1en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Nephrology
dc.subjectAutosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseaseen_US
dc.subjectGlobal longitudinal Strainen_US
dc.subjectTwo-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiographyen_US
dc.titleCardiac function assessed by myocardial deformation in adult polycystic kidney disease patientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12882-019-1500-1
dc.identifier.pmid31419965


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