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dc.contributor.authorKay, A.R.
dc.contributor.authorBlaustein, M.P.
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-05T17:00:27Z
dc.date.available2019-08-05T17:00:27Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85064193048&doi=10.1085%2fjgp.201812274&partnerID=40&md5=a4dadcb8f02e4a23f3250b24d179b0e9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/10181
dc.description.abstractAll animal cells are surrounded by a flexible plasma membrane that is permeable to water and to small ions. Cells thus face a fundamental problem: the considerable tension that their membranes would experience if the osmotic influx of water, driven by the presence of impermeant intracellular ions, was left unopposed. The pivotal study that described the cell's remedy for this impending osmotic catastrophe-the "pump-leak mechanism" (PLM)-was published in the Journal of General Physiology by Tosteson and Hoffman in 1960. Their work revealed how the sodium pump stabilizes cell volume by eliminating the osmotic gradient. Here we describe the mechanistic basis of the PLM, trace the history of its discovery, and place it into the context of our current understanding.en_US
dc.description.urihttps://doi.org/10.1085/jgp.201812274en_US
dc.language.isoen-USen_US
dc.publisherRockefeller University Pressen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of General Physiology
dc.subjectpump leak mechanismen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Physiological Phenomenaen_US
dc.subject.meshOsmotic Pressure--physiologyen_US
dc.titleEvolution of our understanding of cell volume regulation by the pump-leak mechanismen_US
dc.typearticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1085/jgp.201812274
dc.identifier.pmid30782603


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