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dc.contributor.authorJani, Jayshree
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-07T18:26:21Z
dc.date.available2012-03-07T18:26:21Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10713/1011
dc.descriptionUniversity of Maryland, Baltimore. Social Work. Ph.D. 2008en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Global Burden of Disease Unit estimates that by the year 2020, mental and neurological disorders will cause almost 15% of the disabilities among the people of the world. Multi-national studies demonstrate that women are twice as likely as men to experience major depression, and have a higher prevalence of other common mental disorders (CMD) (World Health Organization, 2006). The World Health Organization (2000) urges that gender be incorporated into country specific mental health research because of its socially contextualized nature. Due to the high correlation between CMD and poverty, it is predicted that there are higher rates of CMD in developing nations (Chant, 2003). Yet, there is a paucity of research examining mental health in third world countries. As part of social work's mission to promote the general welfare of society on a global level (NASW, 1996), research investigating the well being of people living in third world countries is warranted. This dissertation is guided by feminist theory which calls for a critical, historical, gendered analysis of the interconnection between macro political, social and economic realities and their impact on people's everyday lives. This perspective was synthesized into an adapted testable model (Beiser, 2006) to examine predictors of mental health in Barrio 3-80 of Managua, Nicaragua. This study includes four research objectives focused on gender roles, self-esteem, and social support as predictors of CMD. With approval of the Nicaraguan government, data were collected from 227 adult residents of the neighborhood through face to face individual interviews. Quantitative data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Six participants also answered a set of qualitative questions. A high level of CMD was discovered among all respondents, but women were found to have significantly higher CMD scores. Self-esteem was negatively correlated to CMD and was the only significant predictor of CMD. Self-esteem scores were high. Income was not related to self-esteem or CMD. The findings highlight the substantive agency of "oppressed" women regardless of a lack of formal power within a traditional power structure. The importance of culturally and contextually appropriate measurement and theory and other implications for social work are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Clinicalen_US
dc.subjectGender Studiesen_US
dc.subject.lcshWomen--Mental health--Nicaraguaen_US
dc.subject.meshSocial Worken_US
dc.titlePredictors of mental health in a neighborhood of Managua, Nicaragua: A gendered analysisen_US
dc.typedissertationen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDeForge, Bruce R.
dc.identifier.ispublishedyes
dc.description.urinameFull Text


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