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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10713/6782

Title: Tripartite treatment by radiation, hyperthermia and anti-OX40 immunotherapy potentiates tumor growth delay and tumor microenvironment immunomodulation in pancreatic cancer
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Authors: Alexander, Allen Abey
Advisors: Mahmood, Javed
Date: 2017
Embargoed Until: 2018-01-01
Abstract: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most deadly cancer in the United States. Despite development in conventional treatment strategies the 5 year survival rate is only 7.7%. In this study we demonstrated that the tripartite treatment by combination of fractionated radiation therapy, hyperthermia and anti-OX40 immunotherapy (tripartite) led to significant impact on pancreatic cancer in mice. The treatment of mice with the tripartite treatment demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition (p<0.0001) with no observable toxicity due to this treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of the tumor showed a shift in tumor microenvironment from immune suppressive to immune stimulatory with significantly higher CD4+ and CD8a+ (p<0.05) T lymphocytes. A significantly higher population of helper T cells and cytotoxic T cells was observed in the usually immune-deficient pancreatic cancer tumor microenvironment coupled with a decrease in the immunosuppressive microenvironment in the tumors of animals receiving the tripartite treatment is potentially the cause of the superior anti-tumor effect observed in animals receiving the tripartite treatment.
Subject Keywords: fractionated-radiation
hyperthermia
pancreatic cancer
syngeneic mouse model
tripartite
Pancreas--Cancer
Fever
Immunotherapy
Description: University of Maryland, Baltimore. Molecular Medicine. M.S. 2017
Type: dissertation
Appears in Collections:Theses and Dissertations Graduate School
Theses and Dissertations School of Medicine

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